Read Lobo, Rag and Vixen by Ernest Thompson Seton Online

lobo-rag-and-vixen

Excerpt: ...for a safe rise, so he squatted low. The dog came within ten feet of him, and the stranger, coming across to Cuddy, passed at five feet, but he never moved till a chance came to slip behind the great trunk away from both. Then he safely rose and flew to the lonely glen by Taylor's Hill. One by one the deadly cruel gun had stricken his near ones down, till now,Excerpt: ...for a safe rise, so he squatted low. The dog came within ten feet of him, and the stranger, coming across to Cuddy, passed at five feet, but he never moved till a chance came to slip behind the great trunk away from both. Then he safely rose and flew to the lonely glen by Taylor's Hill. One by one the deadly cruel gun had stricken his near ones down, till now, once more, he was alone. The Snow Moon slowly passed with many a narrow escape, and Redruff, now known to be the only survivor of his kind, was relentlessly pursued, and grew wilder every day. It seemed, at length, a waste of time to follow him with a gun, so when the snow was deepest, and food scarcest, Cuddy hatched a new plot. Right across the feeding-ground, almost the only good one now in the Stormy Moon, he set a row of snares. A cottontail rabbit, an old friend, cut several of these with his sharp teeth, but some remained, and Redruff, watching a far-off speck that might turn out a hawk, trod right in one of them, and in an instant was jerked into the air to dangle by one foot. Have the wild things no moral or legal rights? What right has man to inflict such long and fearful agony on a fellow-creature, simply because that creature does not speak his language? All that day, with growing, racking pains, poor Redruff hung and beat his great, strong wings in helpless struggles to be free. All day, all night, with growing torture, until he only longed for death. But no one came. The morning broke, the day wore on, and still he hung there, slowly dying; his very strength a curse. The second night crawled slowly down, and when, in the dawdling hours of darkness, a great Horned Owl, drawn by the feeble flutter of a dying wing, cut short the pain, the deed was wholly kind. The wind blew down the valley from the north. The snow-horses went racing over the wrinkled ice, over the Don Flats, and over the marsh toward the lake, white, for they were driven snow, but on them, scattered dark, were......

Title : Lobo, Rag and Vixen
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781926683386
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 54 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Lobo, Rag and Vixen Reviews

  • Rebecca
    2019-04-07 03:24

    Part of me wonders why I keep reading these. But I find the main part of the stories really interesting. And then. Well, this quote from this book seems to sum up Seton's view on animal stories: "No wild animal dies of old age. Its life has soon or late a tragic end. It is only a question of how long it can hold out against its foes." It's just that it would be nice if sometimes maybe the story didn't go graphically into this tragic end. Do we have to always (almost always) go all the way up to the death? I'm just too much of a happy ending person I guess!

  • Al Gunn
    2019-04-04 03:32

    Found this book on a list of required reading for 7th-8th graders in Minnesota in 1908. As an adult, some of the language made me laugh out loud. Mainly as I imagined some of my 7th grade students reading passages about the animals being shot, hunted or killed by other animals. Gruesome. I would have liked this book as a young boy. As an adult, I find it interesting as a period piece.

  • Cyndi
    2019-04-18 01:48

    I loved the harsh truths in this book. I found it very easy and enjoyable to read, and the narration reminded me of people telling tall tales around a fire. I certainly had a lot of fun with these tales.